Sunday, July 23, 2017

chimney swift roosts, August and September

If you see roosting swifts in these next two months, please report the numbers and locations and dates. Here's how to do it, with directions provided by the Wisconsin Chimney Swift Working Group: http://www.wiswifts.org/report-chimney-swift-sightings/

Monday, July 17, 2017

bumblebee conservation

Over the past two decades, bee declines worldwide have drawn international attention. Managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies decreased by 25% over 20 years in Europe and 59% over 58 years in North America, and many bumble bee populations in Europe and North America have gone locally extinct, resulting in dramatic range contractions. It is important to note that not all bees in all places are declining. Some populations are actually growing, and there are many more for which data are insufficient or nonexistent.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2016-01-complex-worldwide-bee-declines.html#jCp

Ph. Katja Schulz - Wikim. Commons

"Over the past two decades, bee declines worldwide have drawn international attention. Managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies decreased by 25% over 20 years in Europe and 59% over 58 years in North America, and many bumble bee populations in Europe and North America have gone locally extinct, resulting in dramatic range contractions. It is important to note that not all bees in all places are declining. Some populations are actually growing, and there are many more for which data are insufficient or nonexistent. "


Learn more at these links:


Xerces bee conservation page: https://xerces.org/bumblebees/

Over the past two decades, bee declines worldwide have drawn international attention. Managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies decreased by 25% over 20 years in Europe and 59% over 58 years in North America, and many bumble bee populations in Europe and North America have gone locally extinct, resulting in dramatic range contractions. It is important to note that not all bees in all places are declining. Some populations are actually growing, and there are many more for which data are insufficient or nonexistent.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2016-01-complex-worldwide-bee-declines.html#jCp
Over the past two decades, bee declines worldwide have drawn international attention. Managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies decreased by 25% over 20 years in Europe and 59% over 58 years in North America, and many bumble bee populations in Europe and North America have gone locally extinct, resulting in dramatic range contractions. It is important to note that not all bees in all places are declining. Some populations are actually growing, and there are many more for which data are insufficient or nonexistent.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2016-01-complex-worldwide-bee-declines.html#jCp




The complex causes of worldwide bee declines
https://phys.org/news/2016-01-complex-worldwide-bee-declines.html

https://bumblebeeconservation.org/about-bees/why-bees-need-help/

https://www.wpi.edu/news/buzzing-about-bumblebee-decline

Thursday, June 22, 2017

learn about aerial insectivores


The Midwest Aerial Insectivore Discussion Group is on Facebook at this link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1581381955435390/
Join the Discussion Group and learn more!

Find more information at: https://wglbbo.org/aerial-insectivores

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Sponsor a Species for the Wisconsin Breeding Bird Atlas II

 Learn how you can support the Atlas with a species sponsorship!
There are 40+ Wisconsin breeding species yet to be claimed through the Sponsor-a-Species program, a major source of support for the Atlas. Popular species like Northern Saw-whet Owl and Ruby-crowned Kinglet remain, and every dollar of every sponsorship helps support this important citizen science project. We’d love to see every one of our remaining species go to a good sponsorship “home” this summer.

To find information, go to:
http://ebird.org/content/atlaswi/news/species-sponsorship-a-perfect-gift-for-bird-lovers/

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Butterfly Count this Memorial Day weekend


Please consider joining the North American Butterfly Association!

You can participate in a butterfly count on Memorial Day weekend - The NABA Memorial Day Count (in the United States) will be held May 27-29, 2017.

All you need to do is to observe butterflies at one or more of your favorite butterflying localities (such as your own backyard) this coming Memorial Day weekend and note what butterflies you’ve seen. There are no requirements regarding how much time or area you cover.

Then go to the NABA web site, www.naba.org, and from there to the Recent Sightings (sightings.naba.org) web page and enter your report, filling in the location, date, and butterflies seen.


Our good friend Mike Reese is a coordinator for these counts. See his website and contact him at https://wisconsinbutterflies.org/






bird-window strikes and Dr. Daniel Klem

From the COLLISIONS listserv:

An article about one of the people who has advanced our knowledge of bird mortality from window strikes:


"The bird-window collision issue is really gaining traction and it is because of everyone's combined efforts, and all should be proud of what this has done to advance our common cause."

From:
Peter G. Saenger
Acopian Center for Ornithology
Department of Biology
Muhlenberg College
2400 Chew Street
Allentown, Pa  18104-5586