Monday, July 17, 2017

bumblebee conservation

Over the past two decades, bee declines worldwide have drawn international attention. Managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies decreased by 25% over 20 years in Europe and 59% over 58 years in North America, and many bumble bee populations in Europe and North America have gone locally extinct, resulting in dramatic range contractions. It is important to note that not all bees in all places are declining. Some populations are actually growing, and there are many more for which data are insufficient or nonexistent.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2016-01-complex-worldwide-bee-declines.html#jCp

Ph. Katja Schulz - Wikim. Commons

"Over the past two decades, bee declines worldwide have drawn international attention. Managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies decreased by 25% over 20 years in Europe and 59% over 58 years in North America, and many bumble bee populations in Europe and North America have gone locally extinct, resulting in dramatic range contractions. It is important to note that not all bees in all places are declining. Some populations are actually growing, and there are many more for which data are insufficient or nonexistent. "


Learn more at these links:


Xerces bee conservation page: https://xerces.org/bumblebees/

Over the past two decades, bee declines worldwide have drawn international attention. Managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies decreased by 25% over 20 years in Europe and 59% over 58 years in North America, and many bumble bee populations in Europe and North America have gone locally extinct, resulting in dramatic range contractions. It is important to note that not all bees in all places are declining. Some populations are actually growing, and there are many more for which data are insufficient or nonexistent.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2016-01-complex-worldwide-bee-declines.html#jCp
Over the past two decades, bee declines worldwide have drawn international attention. Managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies decreased by 25% over 20 years in Europe and 59% over 58 years in North America, and many bumble bee populations in Europe and North America have gone locally extinct, resulting in dramatic range contractions. It is important to note that not all bees in all places are declining. Some populations are actually growing, and there are many more for which data are insufficient or nonexistent.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2016-01-complex-worldwide-bee-declines.html#jCp




The complex causes of worldwide bee declines
https://phys.org/news/2016-01-complex-worldwide-bee-declines.html

https://bumblebeeconservation.org/about-bees/why-bees-need-help/

https://www.wpi.edu/news/buzzing-about-bumblebee-decline

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